EdTech 513: Project #3: Haiku Deck

I really enjoyed the simplicity and ease of use of Haiku Deck. This site allows you to create PowerPoint-like presentations, but limits your text. My goal was to have as little of text possible on each slide and have the main parts of the presentation be the visuals. Haiku Deck is awesome in that it allows you to search over 40 million images that fit your presentation needs. In addition, if you use the images provided by the site, it cites the photos used for you! How awesome!

For my presentation, I decided to do the basics of the marketing mix, also known as the 4 P’s (product, price, place, and promotion). This concept is the foundation of marketing. When using Haiku Deck, I learned that what I am teaching can easily be expressed in less text and awesome visuals. I love how I was able to keep each slide simple with just a picture and the topic that I was discussing as the title text. The slide notes allow for me to expand on what I would like to teach. This allows for a clean look and delivery of information, without the chaos of an overwhelming slide of text. I think this site would be great for not only teacher presentations, but student presentations as well. Not allowing a lot of text forces users to keep it to only what is absolutely necessary and then expand on each topic as they present. I believe this type of presentation would benefit audience engagement.

I will definitely be looking into using this site again. One disappointment was that you only get a 7 day free trial and then after there is a fee. However, I loved how easy it was to use and how it forced me to simplify my presentation! Click the link below to see my Haiku Deck:

Marketing Mix Haiku Deck

EdTech 541: Integrating Technology into Classroom Curriculum

I am so excited to be taking this course! Today, I explored Weebly, and began creating my own web page for this course. I really enjoyed how easy the site was to navigate and all the options that are available. My goal for the next school year is to create a class website. Wix and Weebly will definitely be my top choices as web platforms! Check out my course website here.

As a marketing teacher, I am always looking for new and fun ways to integrate technology into the classroom. Our assignment for this week was to create an I Am poem using the provided format and then add and image that symbolizes us. I liked this assignment a lot and appreciated the freedom to express oneself. It was fun to get to know my classmates by reading their poems as well. This would be a great intro activity for high school students and incorporates technology well. Below is my I Am poem. Looking forward to an awesome semester!

gilin-i-am-poem

 

EdTech506: Final Project/Reflection

Graphic Design for Learning has been one of my favorite classes so far in the EdTech program! I really enjoyed learning about and how to use different graphic design principles. The final project was intense, but I am pleased with the final result. I chose to create a lesson that was about The World of Marketing. For this lesson, I used several images that I created throughout the semester and also incorporated similar assignments for my students. I now have a better understanding of how to use Adobe Fireworks and Piktochart. For my lesson, I chose to use the website generator Wix. This was a very easy interface to use and I plan to use this site to make a class webpage in the future. Click here to see The World of Marketing lesson plan!

EdTech 506: White Space

gilin-whitespace

Users: The users are high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors, ages 15-18 that should all be at, or about at grade reading level. Students will have most likely heard of the terms headline, copy, illustration, and signature, but most likely not in the context of advertising.

Why Will These Work?:  I could easily relate to this chapter about white space because I teach about it in my marketing class! White space is used to “divide text and graphics.” (Lohr, 2008, pg. 272). According to the Marketing Essentials textbook, an advertisement “should make a generous use of white or unused space for a clean look.” It also “helps to make the copy legible and creates an “eye flow” for the ad” (Farese, Kimbrell, & Woloszyk, 2012, pg. 478). For my graphic, I decided to created a print advertisement that shows good use of white space. I chose to use an asymmetrical balance which means that “the elements appear to be off balance…which tends to create more visual interest” (Lohr, 2008, pg. 275). I also added in the four different elements of a print ad with arrows showing each part. If I were actually teaching this in class, I would point out the white space and how it makes the ad look well organized and gives it a clean look, directing the customers to through the text and illustrations.

User Test/Changes:  Originally, I did not have the dotted lines above and below the copy and the background was a darker gray. After the user test, my friend suggested that I add something around the copy text to make it look better visually. She also suggested a lighter gray for the background for better contrast. All changes have been updated, please let me know if you have any further feedback.

References:

Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk C.A. (2012). Marketing essentials. New York, NY: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.

Lohr, L. (2008). Creating graphics for learning and performance (2nd ed.).  Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.

 

EdTech 506: Organization

Gilin Organization

Users: The users are high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors, ages 15-18 that should all be at, or about at grade reading level. Students will have most likely heard of “lower prices” and “new and improved products,” but probably have not heard of “economic utility” at this time.

Why Will These Work?: This image was created to help students understand the 3 economic benefits of marketing. Ch. 6 helped me better understand organization through hierarchy. I wanted to organize the information using shapes and cues – which are “a form of hierarchy that uses visuals such as arrows, headings, and lines in instructional materials” (Lohr, 2008, pg. 123). I wanted to be a little more creative than using arrows and lines so I used dotted lines to direct the learner to each economic benefit of utility. I also wanted to create a direction of the students’ eye when reading the graphic. “By placing important information onto a horizontal or vertical alignment, it is more likely to be noticed” (Lohr, 2008, pg. 128). I worked to accomplish this by placing the most important information at the top and then include the three benefits below. The user will use the vertical and horizontal alignment to direct their eye, top, then left to right. I used figure 6-4 on page 129 for inspiration. I tried to incorporate some nice colors and use of shapes as well and really enjoyed this assignment!

User Test/Changes: Originally, I did not have the black box around the “Economic Benefits of Marketing” title. After the user test, my friend mentioned that I should ad this in to make the groupings and hierarchy clearer. I really like the added contrast between the black and pink as well. She also suggested that I make the dotted lines thicker as they were smaller and had more dots that were not as easy to see. Finally, I ended up changing the fonts in each circle, because I felt it was blurry and looked a little hard to read. All changes have been updated and I am really pleased with the final visual! Please let me know if you have any further feedback.

References:

Lohr, L. (2008). Creating graphics for learning and performance (2nd ed.).  Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.

EdTech 506: Color & Depth

Gilin Color

Users: The users are high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors, ages 15-18 that should all be at, or about at grade reading level. Students have been studying the definition of marketing all year and should be familiar with most terms within the definition.

Why Will These Work?: For this assignment, I wanted to create a visual that clearly states the definition of marketing, but also provided images to help students learn and understand. The definition is broken down into three parts with corresponding images. Color is defined as “a tool of instruction that can make or break the appearance and effectiveness of a document or image” (Lohr, 2008, pg. 264). I used a grey background to provide contrast to the images and text. For the text, a primary color (blue), complimentary colors (blue and orange), and secondary colors (orange and purple) were used. Depth was utilized by having the main background blue and layering black before the grey. My goal was to create a frame-like visual for the definition to “make the information stand out” (Lohr, 2008, pg. 270). I believe this was accomplished!

User Test/Changes: Originally, I did not have the images and the graphic was not as visually pleasing. It looked incomplete with just the definition broken into parts. I also had the text and visuals closer together which made it look too crowded. This was all feedback from the user test. I found several helpful images to describe each part of the definition and spaced it out better, making it look more organized and effective. The above image is the updated version. I feel as though this image will help students not only learn, but actually understand the meaning of marketing.

References:

Lohr, L. (2008). Creating graphics for learning and performance (2nd ed.).  Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.

EdTech 506: Selection Project

Gilin Selection Project

Users: The users are high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors, ages 15-18 that should all be at, or about at grade reading level. Students have most likely heard of the words “form” and “utility,” but probably not in the context in terms of marketing.

Why Will These Work?: After reading Chapter 5, I tried to focus on three of the characteristics to “create an effective instructional visual: concentrated, concise, and concrete” (Lohr, 2008, pg. 102). The graphic is concentrated because there are key visual points, such as the fabric, thread, and button, and a key text point, the word “form” that are emphasized (Lohr, 2008, pg. 102). I made the visual concise by keeping it as simple as possible. It is concrete because the message is meaningful to represent one of the five economic utilities. In addition, I changed the background to a light grey and added in black boxes/bubbles to add contrast. I changed the opacity of the shirt to make it look lighter so that each aspect that makes up the shirt was the main focus.

User Test/Changes: Originally, I had a different font for the form utility definition. I also did not have the black background boxes behind the title and definition. After the user test, she suggested that I change the font so that it was easier to read, and also add some contrasting boxes to add to the parts of the shirt theme and make the title/text look more organized. The above image is the updated version.

References:

Lohr, L. (2008). Creating graphics for learning and performance (2nd ed.).  Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.

EdTech 506: CARP Project

Gilin CARP

Users: The users are high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors, ages 15-18 that should all be at, or about at grade reading level. It is likely that most, if not all of these terms will be new to students.

Why Will These Work?: In this week’s reading, CARP was discussed in further detail. CARP stands for Contrast, Alignment, Repetition, and Proximity. For my graphic, I created a visual of the four ways that markets are segmented.

Contrast: Contrast can be utilized “by establishing differences between elements in a visual” (Lohr, 2008, pg. 200). Contrast was used a few times in this visual. I coordinated the color of each way to segment, grouping them with each corresponding graphic and changing the color to match. In addition, I used contrast by making the font bold for the type of segmentation and not for the explanation.

Alignment: The graphics, type of segmentation, and explanations are left-aligned for “easier reading” (Lohr, 2008, pg. 201). It makes the graphic look well-organized and consistent.

Repetition: I was consistent by choosing one graphic to describe each type of segmentation, used dashed lines to separate each type, and used the same fonts. The box is repeated for each type of segmentation.

Proximity: I used proximity to show how each graphic is related to the type of segmentation and explanation within the each box. Each box has some space in between to show that they are all related to the concept of market segmentation.

User Test/Changes: Originally, I had graphics on both sides of the text. My friend said that it made the image too crowded and seemed a bit overwhelming. The updated image is simple, yet hopefully effective. It also is not as confusing. By having the pictures aligned-left with the text, your eye goes directly to the graphics and then right into reading the text.

References:

Lohr, L. (2008). Creating graphics for learning and performance (2nd ed.).  Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.

EdTech 506: Design Model

Gilin Design Model

Users: The users are high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors, ages 15-18 that should all be at, or about at grade reading level. Some of these terms, such as promotion, selling, pricing, and marketing will be words that students have heard and used before. The terms marketing information management, channel management, market planning, and product/service management will probably be terms that are new to students.

Why Will These Work?: When reading this section, I really focused on using the ACE model as guidance. ACE stands for analyze, create, and evaluate (Lohr, 2008, pg. 73). The graphic that I chose to create represents the 7 Core Functions of Marketing that include Marketing Information Management, Channel Management, Promotion, Selling, Pricing, Market Planning, and Product Service Management (Farese, Kimbrell, & Woloszyk, 2012, pp 8-9). I began by analyzing the 7 functions that make up marketing and brainstormed an analogy to compare them to. Analyzing really helped me to “identify the purpose of the instructional visual” and I began with the end in mind (Lohr, 2008, pg. 75). I concluded that 7 functions of marketing are like an umbrella. All are a necessary parts to make up marketing as a whole. If a function is missing, the marketing process will not work properly, just as if a part of an umbrella is broken or there is a hole in the canopy, it will not keep rain out. When creating this graphic, I wanted to make it simple, yet effective. I also wanted it to be more unique than the average graphic organizer. I decided to break the umbrella canopy into 7 sections to represent the 7 functions of marketing. Each section is a different color to represent that each part is its own function and uniquely relates to marketing as a whole.

I used the vector tool to free form draw each section, copied and pasted and then transformed, flipping horizontally so that it was identical on the opposite side. In addition, I used the text tool and drew lines that allowed me to attach the text to the path drawn so that it would align inside the umbrella (Lohr, 2008, pg. 84).

User Test: I had my friend look at the original visual (which didn’t have the word marketing on the handle). The word marketing was originally on top of the umbrella canopy. After the user test, my friend mentioned that placing the word on top of the umbrella made it look like I was trying to protect the functions from the word marketing (as an umbrella protects a person from the rain). This was definitely not my intention.

Changes: During the evaluation portion, I made changes to the image to clearly display that marketing is connected to the 7 functions, not against them. I had the idea to make the word a part of the handle. This displays that the 7 functions make up marketing and without marketing, the 7 functions are nothing more than independent terms. This goes back to my umbrella analogy. If the is no handle and nothing to hold the umbrella together, it loses its function.

References:

Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk C.A. (2012). Marketing essentials. New York, NY: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.

Lohr, L. (2008). Creating graphics for learning and performance (2nd ed.).  Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.