EdTech 506: CARP Project

Gilin CARP

Users: The users are high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors, ages 15-18 that should all be at, or about at grade reading level. It is likely that most, if not all of these terms will be new to students.

Why Will These Work?: In this week’s reading, CARP was discussed in further detail. CARP stands for Contrast, Alignment, Repetition, and Proximity. For my graphic, I created a visual of the four ways that markets are segmented.

Contrast: Contrast can be utilized “by establishing differences between elements in a visual” (Lohr, 2008, pg. 200). Contrast was used a few times in this visual. I coordinated the color of each way to segment, grouping them with each corresponding graphic and changing the color to match. In addition, I used contrast by making the font bold for the type of segmentation and not for the explanation.

Alignment: The graphics, type of segmentation, and explanations are left-aligned for “easier reading” (Lohr, 2008, pg. 201). It makes the graphic look well-organized and consistent.

Repetition: I was consistent by choosing one graphic to describe each type of segmentation, used dashed lines to separate each type, and used the same fonts. The box is repeated for each type of segmentation.

Proximity: I used proximity to show how each graphic is related to the type of segmentation and explanation within the each box. Each box has some space in between to show that they are all related to the concept of market segmentation.

User Test/Changes: Originally, I had graphics on both sides of the text. My friend said that it made the image too crowded and seemed a bit overwhelming. The updated image is simple, yet hopefully effective. It also is not as confusing. By having the pictures aligned-left with the text, your eye goes directly to the graphics and then right into reading the text.

References:

Lohr, L. (2008). Creating graphics for learning and performance (2nd ed.).  Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.

EdTech 506: Design Model

Gilin Design Model

Users: The users are high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors, ages 15-18 that should all be at, or about at grade reading level. Some of these terms, such as promotion, selling, pricing, and marketing will be words that students have heard and used before. The terms marketing information management, channel management, market planning, and product/service management will probably be terms that are new to students.

Why Will These Work?: When reading this section, I really focused on using the ACE model as guidance. ACE stands for analyze, create, and evaluate (Lohr, 2008, pg. 73). The graphic that I chose to create represents the 7 Core Functions of Marketing that include Marketing Information Management, Channel Management, Promotion, Selling, Pricing, Market Planning, and Product Service Management (Farese, Kimbrell, & Woloszyk, 2012, pp 8-9). I began by analyzing the 7 functions that make up marketing and brainstormed an analogy to compare them to. Analyzing really helped me to “identify the purpose of the instructional visual” and I began with the end in mind (Lohr, 2008, pg. 75). I concluded that 7 functions of marketing are like an umbrella. All are a necessary parts to make up marketing as a whole. If a function is missing, the marketing process will not work properly, just as if a part of an umbrella is broken or there is a hole in the canopy, it will not keep rain out. When creating this graphic, I wanted to make it simple, yet effective. I also wanted it to be more unique than the average graphic organizer. I decided to break the umbrella canopy into 7 sections to represent the 7 functions of marketing. Each section is a different color to represent that each part is its own function and uniquely relates to marketing as a whole.

I used the vector tool to free form draw each section, copied and pasted and then transformed, flipping horizontally so that it was identical on the opposite side. In addition, I used the text tool and drew lines that allowed me to attach the text to the path drawn so that it would align inside the umbrella (Lohr, 2008, pg. 84).

User Test: I had my friend look at the original visual (which didn’t have the word marketing on the handle). The word marketing was originally on top of the umbrella canopy. After the user test, my friend mentioned that placing the word on top of the umbrella made it look like I was trying to protect the functions from the word marketing (as an umbrella protects a person from the rain). This was definitely not my intention.

Changes: During the evaluation portion, I made changes to the image to clearly display that marketing is connected to the 7 functions, not against them. I had the idea to make the word a part of the handle. This displays that the 7 functions make up marketing and without marketing, the 7 functions are nothing more than independent terms. This goes back to my umbrella analogy. If the is no handle and nothing to hold the umbrella together, it loses its function.

References:

Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk C.A. (2012). Marketing essentials. New York, NY: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.

Lohr, L. (2008). Creating graphics for learning and performance (2nd ed.).  Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.

EdTech 506: Shape Tools

Gilin Shape
Users:
The users are high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors, ages 15-18 that should all be at, or about at grade reading level. A majority of students will have heard of all of these words before, but perhaps not in the context as related to marketing.

Why Will These Work?: For my 4 P’s of marketing visual, I created images using different colors and shapes to help focus the attention on these 4 aspects (Lohr, 2008, pg. 252). In addition, I added arrows to provide direction to display the relationship between the 4 P’s and the target market (Lohr, 2008, pg. 254). All 4 of the P’s should be directed at the target market in order to be successful. The target market is the intended buyers of the product. Product includes what the company is trying to sell, place refers to where the product is sold, price is how much it costs, and promotion is how the company advertises or promotes the product (Farese, Kimbrell, & Woloszyk, 2012, pp 20-23).

For these images, I used a combination of lines and shapes. More specifically, circles, rectangles, arrows, the doughnut and beveled rectangle shapes. I added color to make each look more realistic and stand out to the user.

User Test: I had my friend look at the original visual (which didn’t have the arrows). She suggested to add in the arrows so that there would be a unified direction, displaying how the 4 P’s are related to the target market.

Changes: I made the changes to the image by adding in 4 arrows, coming from each P of marketing. Before, the images were just shown as 4 different parts, but it was not clearly displayed how each related to the target market. This simple change really added to the image and shows that each is important and should be aligned to the target market.

References:

Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk C.A. (2012). Marketing essentials. New York, NY: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.

Lohr, L. (2008). Creating graphics for learning and performance (2nd ed.).  Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.

EdTech 506 – Typography

Gilin Typography

Users: The users are high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors, ages 15-18 that should all be at, or about at grade reading level. A majority of students will have seen all four of these used in some way, but perhaps not in the context as related to marketing.

Why Will These Work?: For all four words, I tried to match each font with the meaning of the words, which was suggested in the text (Lohr, 2008, pg. 214).

Time: For the word time, I chose to create the word as it would be displayed digitally, such as how time is shown on digital clock. In marketing terms, time is one of the 5 economic utilities and refers to “having a product or service available at a certain time of year or a convenient time of day” (Farese, Kimbrell, & Woloszyk, 2012, pg. 14).

Target: For the word target, I decided to use a visual that resonates well with what I think of as a target. For me, I think of a bulls-eye on a dart board so I used vector shapes in Fireworks to create this within the letter “g.” I choose to place it on this letter because it is in the middle of the word, just as it is on a dart board. In marketing terms, a target market is “the group that is identified for a specific marketing program” (Farese, et al., 2012, pg. 18).

Price: For the word price, I incorporated the cents symbol to replace the letter “c.” In addition, I changed the color of the cents symbol to green to add contrast and symbolize money, which is commonly associated with the color green (Lohr, 2008, pg. 215). In marketing terms, price is “what is exchanged for a product,” and is one of the 4 P’s of marketing (Farese, et al. 2012, pg. 21).

Segmentation: For the word segmentation, I chose to break the word into 3 different “segments,” by changing the colors. After completing the user test, I decided to break the word into chunks and utilized proximity by adding the space to emphasize the reasoning for each color change (Lohr, 2008, pg. 215). In marketing terms, market segmentation is “the process of classifying people who form a given market into even smaller groups,” which I feel is displayed well here (Farese, et al., 2012, pg. 43).

User Test: I had my friend look at the four words and she thought they displayed the words well and that the goal of making the words look like their meanings was achieved. As mentioned, she made the suggestion to break up the word segmentation by adding spaces each time I changed the colors.

Changes: I made changes to the word segmentation by adding in the spaces where appropriate. I had a hard time deciding which fonts to use for target and segmentation and would be open to any suggestions for fonts that would exemplify their meanings even more!

References:

Farese, L.S., Kimbrell, G., & Woloszyk C.A. (2012). Marketing essentials. New York, NY: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.

Lohr, L. (2008). Creating graphics for learning and performance (2nd ed.).  Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.

(Farese, Kimbrell, & Woloszyk, 2012, pg. 14).